Feb 142019
 
 February 14, 2019  Posted by  Breaches, Business

Alfred Ng writes:

I’m dribbling a basketball in one hand, with a phone in the other, adjusting the tightness on a pair of Nike’s Bluetooth-connected, self-tying Adapt BB sneakers on my feet.

The futuristic shoes, which go on sale for $350 on Feb. 17, alternate between boa constrictor-tight and comfy slipper-loose as I toggle through the app like a child flicking a light switch for the first time.

Goofing around, I try to grab my colleague’s phone so I can suffocate him via sneakers as we run around the basketball court at Nike’s headquarters in New York. All of a sudden, he isn’t trying to just play defense in basketball; he has to guard his phone, too.

Athletic apparel companies like Nike, Under Armour and Puma may find themselves similarly on the defensive as they lead the charge to infuse technology into their sneakers. After all, the smarter the object, the more likely it is to be hacked. It’s a worrisome trend that industries are dealing with as they try to find the balance between adding convenience and protecting your privacy.

Read more on CNET.

h/t, Joe Cadillic

  One Response to “With smart sneakers, privacy risks take a great leap”

  1. We have met the enemy…

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