Oct 242014
 
 October 24, 2014  Posted by  Surveillance, U.S.

Nadia Kayyali writes:

Even the reports that are supposed to provide transparency about the FBI’s use of national security lettters (NSLs) are secret—or at least a couple dozen pages of them are. NSLs are nonjudicial orders that allow the FBI to obtain information from companies, without a warrant, about their customers’ use of services. They almost always contain a gag order, which prohibits recipients from even saying they’ve received the request.

Two Office of the Inspector General (OIG) reports reviewing the FBI’s use of NSLs from 2007 and 2008 were reissued earlier this week after having portions declassified. You can see the newly released versions of the 2007 report here and the 2008 report here.

Read more on EFF.

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