Oct 162010
 
 October 16, 2010  Online

Dave Birch writes:

Many people have a real problem with the apparently anonymous nature of the interweb. I say “apparently” because, of course, unless you work really hard at it and really understand how the internet works, and really understand how your PC works, and really plan it carefully, you’re not really anonymous in the proper sense of the word.

Our sense of anonymity is largely an illusion. Pretty much everything we do online, down to individual keystrokes and clicks, is recorded, stored in cookies and corporate databases, and connected to our identities, either explicitly through our user names, credit-card numbers and the IP addresses assigned to our computers, or implicitly through our searching, surfing and purchasing histories.

[From The Great Privacy Debate: The Dangers of Web Tracking – WSJ.com]

I’m surprised that politicians, in particular, who keep going on about how terrible internet anonymity is, don’t understand a little more about the dynamics of the problem. If they did, they would realise that anonymity isn’t what it seems.

Read more on Digital Identity Blog.

Via Adam Shostack, who adds his own thoughtful comments over on Emergent Chaos.

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