Mar 282014
 
 March 28, 2014  Featured News, Surveillance

Dan Goodin reports:

Seven months ago, Ars documented CreepyDOL, a low-cost, distributed network of Wi-Fi sensors that stalks smartphone-toting people as they move about neighborhoods or even entire cities. As each node is small enough to be slipped into an overlooked nook at the nearby gym, cafe, or break room, the system can assemble a shockingly detailed dossier of personal data, including the schedules, e-mail addresses, personal photos, and current or past whereabouts of the person or people it monitors.

Now, CreepyDOL—short for Creepy Distributed Object Locator—is about to be outdone by a newly updated DIY stalker device that has the potential to collect orders of magnitude more data from people. Dubbed Snoopy, it can track not only Wi-Fi, but also signals based on radio frequency identification (RFID) and the Bluetooth and 802.15 specifications.

Read more on Ars Technica.

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