May 112010
 
 May 11, 2010  Posted by  Court, Featured News, U.S., Workplace

Jim McElhatton reports:

The Securities and Exchange Commission is facing a federal lawsuit for keeping secret the names of dozens of its supervisors, employees and contractors who spent their workdays looking at pornography on their government computers.

The lawsuit, filed Friday by a Denver- and Washington-based law firm, accuses the SEC of violating federal open-records law by shielding the identities of more than two dozen current and past porn-snooping workers.

“There simply is no privacy right or interest to search pornography on SEC computers, particularly during work hours,” says the 17-page complaint, filed in federal court in Denver.

Read more on NewsMax.com

The case is Steese, Evans & Frankel v. United States Security and Exchange Commission. I’ve uploaded a copy of the complaint, without attachments, here (pdf, 17 pages). They seem to make a strong case for disclosure under FOIA. See what you think.

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