Nov 082014
 

Below are links to news developments or commentaries published during the two days that PogoWasRight.org was unavailable. They are semi-organized by topic, with some overlap between sections.

Great thanks to Joe Cadillic, who helped me keep track of what I needed to save while the site was suffering from Table Dysfunction Disorder:

Businesses:

  • Suspect in rape/abduction captured because car dealership turned on GPS device used to locate loan defaulters (CNN).
  • Carrier IQ to settle snooping app row (Courthouse News and BBC)
  • Two New Delaware Data Privacy Statutes Have Potentially Broad Reach (SchiffHardin)
  • Big Data Changes the Deal: Information Governance Should Now Be Incorporated Into Due Diligence for Corporate Transactions (BakerHostetler Data Privacy Monitor)
  • Trans-Atlantic Business Dialogue Holds Briefing Session on EU-U.S. Safe Harbor Agreement (Covington & Burling InsidePrivacy).

Surveillance:

  • Rap sheets, watchlists and spy networks now available with single click ,  (NextGov)
  • Privacy Groups Denied U.K. Spying-Program Disclosure by Court (Bloomberg)
  • UK: Government forced to release secret policies on surveillance of lawyers (Reprieve)
  • Privacy Group Wins Court Ruling Against FBI’s Facial-Recognition Technology (National Journal and EPIC.org)
  • Downtown San Jose Condo Residents Unnerved By Peeping Drones, City May Crack Down (CBS)
  • Huge raid to shut down 400-plus dark net sites (BBC)
  • Now the GOP Must Choose: Mass Surveillance or Privacy? (The Atlantic)
  • Canadian privacy commissioner looking into new Calgary Police Service technologies (Metro News and CBC News)
  • The Justice Department wants wider hacking authorities for the FBI  (The Intercept)
  • Snowden: Congress needs to encrypt emails (The Hill)
  • Cockroach Cyborgs Use Microphones to Detect, Trace Sounds (NC State News)
  • Peeping into 73,000 unsecured security cameras thanks to default passwords (NetworkWorld)
  • Germany, Brazil push the U.N. to be tougher on digital spying (Reuters)
  • Singapore Parliament: New ERP system ‘not a threat to privacy’ (The Straits Times).
  • Did the government hack a journalist? Maybe, reports Ars Technica
  • The ultimate goal of the NSA is total population control (Commentary, The Guardian)
  • Suspect in rape/abduction captured because car dealership turned on GPS device used to locate loan defaulters (CNN).

Breaches/Data Protection:

  • New GDPR Data Breach Notification Agreement Sparks Debate (IT Governance)
  • PositiveSingles STD dating site faces $16.5m penalty (BBC)
  • Tort damages awarded for privacy breach in Ontario (All About Information)
  • France: CNIL uses publicity as weapon (Data Guidance)
  • Global Privacy Enforcement Network (“GPEN”) Holds Workshop on the Use of Publicity as a Regulatory Compliance Technique (Hunton & Williams Privacy and Information Security Law Blog)
  • Federal sites leaked the locations of people seeking AIDS services for years (Washington Post)
  • DC Circ. Judge Says FTC Conduct Remedies Are Overly Harsh (Law360.com, subscription required)
  • First international standard on cloud services and personal information protection (HRinfodesk)
  • Orange Romania fined RON 10,000 by data protection body (Telecompaper)
  • Carrier IQ to settle snooping app row (BBC)
  • Peeping into 73,000 unsecured security cameras thanks to default passwords (NetworkWorld)
  • Data Breaches: Industry Calls for Single, Federal Breach Notification Standard (JDSupra)

Court:

  • VT Supreme Court finds part of DNA collection statute unconstitutional (SCOV Law Blog)
  • Privacy Groups Denied U.K. Spying-Program Disclosure by Court (Bloomberg)
  • UK: Government forced to release secret policies on surveillance of lawyers (Reprieve)
  • Privacy Group Wins Court Ruling Against FBI’s Facial-Recognition Technology (EPIC.org Courthouse News)
  • PositiveSingles STD dating site faces $16.5m penalty (BBC)
  • Tort damages awarded for privacy breach in Ontario (All About Information)
  • Carrier IQ to settle snooping app row (BBC)

Miscellaneous:

  • Why the World Needs Anonymous (MIT Technology Review)
  • The Arab Spring of Privacy Is Upon Us (Wired)
  • The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of New Zealand has job openings: check them out.
  • First international standard on cloud services and personal information protection (HRinfodesk)
  • Privacy professionals are in demand. Will it lead to better privacy? (Ars Technica)
  • 7 Ways Data Currently Being Collected About You Could Hurt Your Career or Personal Life (The World Post)
  • Naming Names: Was Cornwell Wrong? (Simple Justice)

Workplace:

Youth/Student Privacy:

Laws:

  • Two New Delaware Data Privacy Statutes Have Potentially Broad Reach (SchiffHardin)
  • Data Breaches: Industry Calls for Single, Federal Breach Notification Standard (JDSupra)
  • Australian privacy law: swimming in the porridge of offshore disclosure (Lexology)
  • VT Supreme Court finds part of DNA collection statute unconstitutional (SCOV Law Blog)

If I’ve omitted anything significant, feel free to use the Comments section below.

And remind me: why didn’t I ever seek sponsorship for this site so that I could afford a better server? Feh…

 

  3 Responses to “Getting Caught Up: News You May Have Missed”

  1. Here’s another one:

    Survey Shows You Don’t Care About Privacy As Much As You Think You Do (Forbes).

  2. RE: Survey Shows You Don’t Care About Privacy As Much As You Think You Do

    Could that not also be interpreted as people maybe seeing something of value in exchange for information?

    The article states:

    “Certainly those whose feelings about privacy range from somewhat to very concerned would avoid loyalty cards in order to protect their data, right?”

    “What are we to make of this? If I may state the obvious, once a few dollars are waved in our faces it would appear most of us care a lot less about data privacy than we think we do.”

    Does it mean all these card holders don’t care? Or does it mean many or some of them may see something of value in return for some private information while also being conscious of how this information could be used?

    Would that not fit in with people who do all these online contests or sign up for free offers? They knowingly give some of their info away, yet they get something of value in return.

    Does it mean they don’t care like the article states? Or do some people make a choice and accept the exchange/trade of info for an offer of money savings?

    If they got nothing in return, would they still use the loyalty card in order to be tracked? Would they care enough to even take the card out of their wallets?

    I’m not sure I agree with that Forbes article.

    • I think their point is that although people say they care a lot, their behavior indicates that they’re willing to sacrifice their privacy to save a few bucks, so how much do they really care about privacy?

      It’s a valid point, and suggests that we should be looking at the question of how we make consumers realize that they’re sacrificing a lot more than they realize to save a few bucks.

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