May 022011
 
 May 2, 2011  Court, Surveillance

The US Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit ruled yesterday in favor of police officers who attach GPS tracking devices to vehicles without first obtaining a warrant. The three-judge panel insisted searches of this sort do not violate the Fourth Amendment after considering the case of Juan Cuevas-Perez.

On February 6, 2009, Phoenix, Arizona detective Matthew Shay attached a tracking device to Cuevas-Perez’s Jeep Laredo while it was parked on the street. He did not bother to ask a judge for a warrant. By February 8, the device had tracked the Jeep driving through Missouri. After sixty hours of use the GPS battery died so Shay had other law enforcement agencies track the Jeep to its ultimate destination in Illinois. After following Cuevas-Perez for forty miles, an Illinois State Police pulled him over for “remaining in the left-hand passing lane,” a violation almost never enforced by the department. A subsequent drug dog search uncovered nine packages of heroin.

Read more on TheNewspaper.com. The case is US v. Cuevas-Perez (US Court of Appeals, Seventh Circuit, 4/28/2011)

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