Jan 262011
 
 January 26, 2011  Featured News, Online

Alex Rice announces a welcome decision on Facebook’s blog:

This Friday is Data Privacy Day, an international effort by governments, businesses and advocacy groups to raise awareness about the importance of staying in control of personal information. A key part of controlling information has always been protecting it from security threats like viruses, malware and hackers.

That’s why we’ve developed a number of complex systems that operate behind the scenes to keep you secure on Facebook. In addition, we’ve created some advanced features you can use to help protect yourself even more, such as remote logout and one-time passwords. These features are especially useful when you’re uncertain whether your network or computer is secure. Today, we’re announcing two new such features.

A Secured Connection

If you’ve ever done your shopping or banking online, you may have noticed a small “lock” icon appear in your address bar, or that the address bar has turned green. This indicates that your browser is using a secure connection (“HTTPS”) to communicate with the website and ensure that the information you send remains private. Facebook currently uses HTTPS whenever your password is sent to us, but today we’re expanding its usage in order to help keep your data even more secure.

Starting today we’ll provide you with the ability to experience Facebook entirely over HTTPS. You should consider enabling this option if you frequently use Facebook from public Internet access points found at coffee shops, airports, libraries or schools. The option will exist as part of our advanced security features, which you can find in the “Account Security” section of the Account Settings page.

[…]

Social Authentication

[…]

Instead of showing you a traditional captcha on Facebook, one of the ways we may help verify your identity is through social authentication. We will show you a few pictures of your friends and ask you to name the person in those photos. Hackers halfway across the world might know your password, but they don’t know who your friends are.

Read the entire post on Facebook’s blog.

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