Jun 162010
 
 June 16, 2010  Surveillance, Workplace

Tam Harbert reports:

Michael Workman, an associate professor at the Florida Institute of Technology‘s Nathan M. Bisk College of Business who studies IT security and behavior at corporations, estimates that monitoring responsibilities take up at least 20% of the average IT manager’s time.

Yet most IT professionals never expected they’d be asked to police their colleagues and co-workers in quite this way. How do they feel about this growing responsibility?

Workman says he sees a split among tech workers. Those who specialize in security issues feel that it’s a valid part of IT’s job. But those who have more of a generalist’s role, such as network administrators, often don’t like it.

Computerworld went looking for IT managers who would share their experiences and attitudes, and found a wide variety of viewpoints, ranging from discomfort at having to “babysit” employees to righteous beliefs about “protecting the integrity of the system.” Read on for their stories.

Read more on Computerworld.

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