Jun 262009
 June 26, 2009  Business, U.S.

Three days after ceasing operations, owners of the Clear airport security screening service acknowledged that their database of sensitive customer information may end up in someone else’s hands, but only if it goes to a similar provider, authorized by the U.S. Transportation Security Administration.

“They had your social security information, credit information, where you lived, employment history, fingerprint information,” said Clear customer David Maynor, who is chief technical officer with Errata Security in Atlanta. “They should be the only ones who have access to that information.”


Maynor wants Clear to delete his information, but that isn’t happening, the company said in a note posted to its Web site Thursday.

Clear’s IT partner, Lockheed Martin, is working with the company “to ensure an orderly shutdown as the program closes,” Clear said. But in a section of the note entitled, “Will personally identifiable information be sold?” Clear acknowledged that it could be used by someone else, presumably if Clear’s assets were sold. “If the information is not used for a Registered Traveler program, it will be deleted,” Clear said.

Read more in Computerworld.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.