Category: Children or Students

What will you do on this day in history?

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By , November 8, 2016 9:48 am

Nov. 8, 2016 –

One day, my grandchildren, if I am fortunate enough to have any, may ask “How did Granny and Grandpa vote in the election of 2016?”

So to future generations:

Today, for the first time in more than 35 years, we went to the polls together. Our votes often tend to cancel each other out if we both vote, as we tend to disagree on a lot of issues. But today – today – we both went to vote together because we are both convinced that Donald Trump is despicable and a threat to our country.

And I hope that the GOP will take note: when you have one independent and one ultra-ultra-Conservative both firmly rejecting your candidate for the highest office in this land and both see your candidate as a threat to democracy, you’ve screwed up. While we despise Clinton, too, she was absolutely correct when she said Trump is “unhinged” and “temperamentally unfit” to be President.

In fact, both major parties should take note: we’re tired of voting for the lesser of evils: give us a candidate of good ethical character who loves – and understands – the Constitution and rule of law, and who has some knowledge of both domestic and foreign affairs and will work towards a better world while keeping America strong. Surely you can find someone who meets those criteria, no?

My grandparents came to this country to escape persecution and for the dream of a better life.  Two of them came over with their mothers and siblings after their fathers had come ahead to find a place to live and a job to support them. Two of them came over by themselves, as their siblings sent for them after saving money for their trip. But they all came with a dream. And whenever I see the Statue of Liberty, I am thankful that they had that opportunity. And I am proud that America was the country that took in people and was a “melting pot.” Yes, our country has a long history of discrimination to overcome, but there has been progress, and it needs to continue, not be reversed.

Donald Trump’s vision of America is not my vision. I refuse to be afraid of people who have different religions or come from different cultures. I do not want to live in a country that judges people based on the color of their skin, their religion, or their country of origin. And I refuse to turn my back on those who are fleeing persecution or war-torn countries or who came here to find a better life.

We are better than that, America.

Tonight, I will find out what we, the people, have done to our future. I just hope that we make a decision that future generations will appreciate and that today, we do not create a more dangerous world for them.

On this day in history, I voted. Have you?

Update: Nov. 9.

 

Racism excuses murder? Again?

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By , February 16, 2014 10:04 am

Words fail. To those who said the justice system worked when George Zimmerman was acquitted of murdering Trayvon Martin, what say you all now that Michael Dunn’s jury hung on the charge he murdered Jordan Davis?  Will you stand there and tell me that our justice system worked because the jurors didn’t have enough evidence to warrant a conviction?

Or will you, at long last, be honest and acknowledge that in our country, racism is so pervasive and runs so deep that all a white person needs to claim is “I was afraid of that black person” and a jury will relate to that and see reasonable doubt for a murder charge?

Three words. “I was afraid.” That’s all it takes, it seems, to justify deadly force against an unarmed black youth who was just playing music loud.

And if we spend our lives in isolation and perpetuate the myths and racism, we can then use that as an excuse to kill black youth?

I feel sick inside today.

There are many commentaries all over the Internet, but Ta-Nehisi Coates’ column reduces me to tears.

At long last, have we made no progress in this country?  Was electing a black president a sign of progress, or did we just put an “oreo” in the White House so we could tell ourselves and the world that America is not a deeply racist country?

My heart goes out to the families of  black youth who were and will be killed because they are black. I could not and likely would not have said what Jordan Davis’s mother said after the jury verdict yesterday.  Her comments may have prevented riots, but Jordan Davis did not get justice yesterday. And nor will the next black teen unless there is a tectonic shift in our country.

 

 

What do you teach your children?

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By , July 4, 2013 12:34 pm

When my children were younger, I used to read them books for children about American history. I took them to Lexington, Concord, Boston, Gettysburg, and other historical areas. I wanted them to appreciate some of the great things our country had done and the sacrifices made for democracy and equality.

But it’s been too many Fourth of July’s since I have felt any pride in America. What would I teach my children now? What do you teach your children now?

And how will you answer your young children when they grow up and ask, “Why didn’t you do something to stop the government from turning this country into a surveillance state? Why didn’t you do something to stop the government from taking away women’s rights to control their bodies? What kind of country did you leave me?”

It would be too simplistic – and ineffective – to simply say “Oust the Republicans from Congress,” because there are too many Democrats who agree with them.

We need a more fundamental shift in our country to get us back on course. Will you be part of it?

#Restorethe4th is not a total solution, but it’s an important part. Get behind it and take action.

The difficult expert witness

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By , June 12, 2010 10:10 pm

So Kid #2 was told to show up for mock court where she and her colleagues would be role-playing expert witnesses while law students would try to hone their skills. First she role-played a psychologist testifying for the defense.  Later she role-played a psychiatrist testifying for the prosecution.  Same case and reports, just different roles.

I feel somewhat  sorry for the law students, as Kid #2 got really into her part and any opening they left her on cross-examination, she managed to make her point.  She said all she could hear was the law profs exhorting the law students, “Control the witness.  CONTROL the witness.”

“Oh,” she asked sweetly, feigning innocence.  “Am I being difficult?”

I understand the law students have asked for a re-match.  🙂

Remembering

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By , May 4, 2010 7:54 pm
kentstate

John Filo's iconic photo of Mary Ann Vecchio, a fourteen-year-old runaway, kneeling over the body of Jeffrey Miller after he was shot dead by the Ohio National Guard.

40 years ago today.

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