Jul 152016
 
 July 15, 2016  Breaches, Laws

Hannah Lepow writes:

Today, Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Calif.) introduced legislation that would criminalize the non-consensual distribution of sexually explicit images, commonly referred to as “revenge porn.”

The Internet Privacy Protection Act would make it a federal crime for individuals to knowingly distribute sexually explicit images or video of a person without or with a “reckless disregard” for their consent and for websites to intentionally promote or solicit such content.  Borrowing the terms of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, the law would not apply to websites and other interactive computer service providers that merely show content provided by another information content provider.  (Twitter and Facebook have backed the bill, while Google is staying neutral, according to The Hill.)  The law also would not apply to voluntary exposure or visual depictions in public places or in the public interest.  The proposed penalties range from fines to up to five years in prison.

Read more on Covington & Burling Inside Privacy.

Update: As I anticipated, Scott Greenfield is highly critical of the bill.

  One Response to “Bill Criminalizing “Revenge Porn” Introduced in Congress (updated)”

  1. Yup, this is great bill and all over Rep Clark’s Twitter feed too.

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