Dissent

Aug 202019
 
 August 20, 2019  Posted by  Surveillance, U.S.

Joe Cadillic writes:

America’s fear of mass-shootings is about to take a truly bizarre turn. That’s because our law enforcement will soon be used as fortune tellers to spy on future criminals.

How will law enforcement be used as fortune tellers?

A recent Albuquerque Journal article revealed that law enforcement will flag people that they think might pose a potential risk:

“Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham directed state Homeland Security and Emergency Management Secretary Jackie Lindsay to start enrolling all 33 county sheriffs in a data-sharing program so that individuals deemed a potential risk could be flagged and monitored.”

Read more on MassPrivateI.

Aug 202019
 
 August 20, 2019  Posted by  Healthcare, Laws, Non-U.S.

Rebecca Mackin of Sheppard Mullin writes:

The European Data Protection Board and the European Data Protection Supervisor recently issued a joint opinion on the processing of personal data and the role of the European Commission within the eHealth Digital Health Service Infrastructure. As background, the eHealth Network is a network of eHealth authorities designated by the EU member states. Its main purpose is ensure the continuity of cross-border healthcare of patients as they move throughout the EU. To realize this goal, the Commission created the eHDSI, the system which enables the exchange of electronic patient data amongst member states. To clarify its role as the eHDSI creator and operator, the Commission sought the joint opinion of the EDPS and EDPS as to whether it was acting as a processor.

Read more on Eye on Privacy.

Aug 192019
 
 August 19, 2019  Posted by  Breaches, Featured News, Govt, Non-U.S.

Jack Horgan-Jones reports:

The State has been told it must delete data held on 3.2 million citizens, which was gathered as part of the roll-out of the Public Services Card, as there is no lawful basis for retaining it.

In a highly critical report on its investigation into the card, the Data Protection Commission found there was no legal reason to make individuals obtain the card in order to access State services such as renewing a driving licence or applying for a college grant.

Read more on Irish Times.

h/t, Joe Cadillic

Aug 192019
 
 August 19, 2019  Posted by  Business, Court, Featured News, Non-U.S., Surveillance, Workplace

Al Restar reports:

The Australian court ruled that employees are allowed to refuse to provide biometric data to their employees. The ruling follows the lawsuit filed by Jeremy Lee getting fired from his previous job due to his refusal of providing his fingerprint samples for the company’s newly installed fingerprint login system.

Jeremy Lee from Queensland, Australia, won a landmark case after he was fired from his job at Superior Wood Pty Ltd, a lumber manufacturer, in February 2018, for refusing to provide his fingerprints to sign in and out of his work, citing that he was unfairly dismissed from the company.

Read more on Z6Mag.