Feb 012018
 
 February 1, 2018  Misc

Tracy Thomas writes:

Danielle Keats Citron, A Poor Mother’s Right to Privacy: A Review, 98 Boston J. L. Rev. (forthcoming)

Collecting personal data is a feature of daily life. Businesses, advertisers, agencies, and law enforcement amass massive reservoirs of our personal data. This state of affairs—what I am calling the “collection imperative”—is justified in the name of efficiency, convenience, and security. The unbridled collection of personal data, meanwhile, leads to abuses. Public and private entities have disproportionate power over individuals and groups whose information they have amassed. Nowhere is that power disparity more evident than for the state’s surveillance of the indigent. Poor mothers, in particular, have vanishingly little privacy. Whether or not poor mothers receive subsidized prenatal care, the existential state of poor mothers is persistent and indiscriminate state surveillance.

Read more of Citron’s review of The Poverty of Privacy Rights on Gender and the Law Prof Blog.