Nov 302015
 
 November 30, 2015  Business, Govt

Klein Moynihan Turco write:

The FTC’s recent rulemaking contains three separate amendments with respect to Do-Not-Call regulations.

First, the FTC did away with the traditional safe harbor protections afforded to telemarketers and sellers for inadvertent entity-specific Do-Not-Call violations, unless such parties are able to obtain the information necessary from the consumer to honor an internal Do-Not-Call request. Additionally, the amendment adds illustrative examples of the types of burdens the Commission regards as impermissibly interfering with a consumer’s right to be placed on a seller’s internal Do-Not-Call list, including:

  • harassing consumers who make such a request;
  • hanging up on such consumers;
  • failing to honor the request;
  • requiring the consumer to listen to a sales pitch before accepting the request;
  • assessing a charge or fee for honoring the request;
  • requiring the consumer to call a different number to submit the request; and
  • requiring the consumer to identify the seller or charitable organization making the call or on whose behalf the call is made.

Read more on Klein Moynihan Turco.

Nov 302015
 
 November 30, 2015  Featured News, Laws, Surveillance, U.S.

Faiza Patel writes:

The first (and thus far only) roll-back of post-9/11 surveillance authorities was implemented over the weekend: The National Security Agency shuttered its program for collecting and holding the metadata of Americans’ phone calls under Section 215 of the Patriot Act. While bulk collection under Section 215 has ended, the government can obtain access to this information under the procedures specified in the USA Freedom Act. Indeed, some experts have argued that the Agency likely has access to more metadata because its earlier dragnet didn’t cover cell phones or Internet calling. In addition, the metadata of calls made by an individual in the United States to someone overseas and vice versa can still be collected in bulk — this takes place abroad under Executive Order 12333.

Read more on Just Security.

Nov 302015
 
 November 30, 2015  Business, Non-U.S., Surveillance

John Ribeiro reports:

BlackBerry has decided not to operate in Pakistan after Dec. 30, rather than let the local government intercept communications on its enterprise services.

The Pakistani government wanted the ability to monitor all BlackBerry Enterprise Service traffic in the country, including every BES email and BES BBM (BlackBerry Messenger) message, BlackBerry’s Chief Operating Officer Marty Beard wrote in a blog post on Monday.

Read more on Computerworld.

Nov 302015
 
 November 30, 2015  Featured News, Govt

CBS reports:

 Los Angeles is considering sending “Dear John” letters to the homes of men who solicit prostitutes hoping the mail will be opened by mothers, girlfriends or wives.

Privacy advocates are slamming the idea. The plan would use automated license plate readers to generate the letters, which would be aimed at shaming “Johns,” the Los Angeles Daily News reported.

The city council voted Wednesday to ask the City Attorney’s office to examine sending so-called “John Letters,” the Daily News reported.

Council member Nury Martinez, who represents a San Fernando Valley district that has a thriving street prostitution problem, introduced the plan.

Read more on CBS. And do read Nick Selby’s response to the proposal on Medium.

Thanks to Joe Cadillic for the links.