Feb 092011
 
 February 9, 2011  Posted by  Misc

Daphne Guerrero blogs on the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada.

There truly is an app for everything.

Recently, the digital world has been aflutter with news of the first-ever app approved by the Catholic Church – Confession, an app that helps Catholics prepare for the sacrament of confession by guiding the user through “a personalized examination of conscience”:

“To help those that are feeling guilty ready themselves for the sacrament of confession, the app provides a checklist of the Ten Commandments — along with mini-questions based on each — to help in compiling an inventory of malfeasance. The app even lets one add in non-traditional transgressions not already listed.”

One of the selling points of the app appears to be the password-protection feature, enabling you to lock out anyone who may try to find out about your sinnin’ ways. But what seems to be missing is what Little iApps, the developer of Confession, will do with the data they collect. According to reports, the app asks users to also provide information on their age, sex and marital status – paired with detailed information on the user’s transgressions, that’s a potentially detailed profile that would be quite attractive to marketers and others.

Details on the collection and use of the user-provided data wasn’t available on Little iApps’ site…so if the developer is collecting and using information without the user knowing, does that mean they’ve broken one of the commandments themselves – “Thou shalt not steal”?

And oh yeah, what about law enforcement seeking these records? Has anyone looked into that?

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